Looking for tips on limb-walking and a spdier rig?

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16 years 9 months ago #130656 by rangerdude
I'm just now starting to learn to limb-walk and get nervous when doing it. I'm over the hieghts and all that, but can't really limb walk very well. Right now, my Dad's teaching me and it's going ok. I'm trying to learn to balance, so any tips on that would help.And I was just wondering if anyone had any pictures on a spider rig, or a description. Thanks

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16 years 9 months ago - 16 years 9 months ago #130659 by moss
The trick to balancing on a limbwalk is that you shouldn't be balancing. By that I mean that you shouldn't be trying to stand on the limb as if it was a balance beam. Get a high tie-in well above the branch you want to go out on, try to make it 25 feet or more above the branch, the further up from the branch the better. As you go out on the limb figure out which side you can put your feet on. On one side of the branch you'll just swing off the side of it. On the other side you can plant your feet with knees bent and lean back on the rope. The branch is \"between\" you and your tie-in up high. Now you can work your way out. If you're worried about swing back to the trunk (you should be if your TIP is not high enough) put your lanyard on the branch and move it out as you go out. You can crouch down low and practically crawl along the side of the branch. Or you can get underneath it and work your way out on the bottom like a sloth.

You shouldn't be standing straight up on the branch, you're very close to the tipping point if you do that. Use leverage and make your walk easier, lean back and enjoy the stability.

The spider rope or adjustable double-ended lanyard is a long lanyard with a DRT system on each side. Put a biner on each end of the rope. Attach two split tails at the center of the rope, you can also use a long double split tail with a butterfly knot tied in the middle. Anchor the split tails on your center delta. To climb put the biner on one end of the lanyard over a branch, bring it back and attach to your delta. Climb as you would any DRT system. When you reach the TIP take the biner on the other side of the lanyard and advance it over the next branch. Repeat. This is \"alt lanyard\" climbing. It's very useful in close branched conifers and can be used in deciduous trees but is optimal for conifers.

Here's a rough drawing of what I'm describing. Many climbers install a Su Sleeve or similar flexible sleeve on each side of the lanyard to protect the cambium of the branch. One thing to watch out for is hanging a biner in a crotch if you are down climbing on the lanyard. It happens very easily. Also, when you pull a biner out of a crotch it will come right at your face, be forewarned. Climbers often use steel biners on their lanyards to make it easier to throw the end over branches. I disagree with this strategy. Aluminum biners work fine, you can put a throwbag on the biner or wrap it in a monkey fist to throw it. I watched an experienced climber take a steel biner to the face while pulling their lanyard out of a crotch. Big ouch!



-moss
Last edit: 16 years 9 months ago by moss.
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16 years 9 months ago #130661 by rangerdude
Cool, thanks. My Dad trys to get me to stand up straight, but I'll try this. For me it's just the fear of slipping and swinging into the trunk. Thanks for the help on the spider rig to. I have a spare 60ft or so rope, so I'll try this out. Thanks alot

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16 years 9 months ago #130662 by nickfromwi
Stand up STRAIGHT? I think he might be steering you wrong. Unless you have a TIP that is directly over head, it is hard to stand up straight.

When I do it, I am leaning out away from my TIP. My TIP is trying to pull me back toward the trunk, but I lean out against it, the friction of my shoes/boots keeping me from sliding back into the tree.

I might have a pic- lemme check.

love
nick

Would you like a lanyard spliced up, or anything else for that matter??? Give me a call- 323-384-7770 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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16 years 9 months ago #130663 by nickfromwi
Here is a pic of some one about 40' out on the ends of a oak limb. You can see the rope is going up and to the left at a kindof sharp angle.

Hmmm....maybe this needs to be a youtube vid?!?!

love
nick

Would you like a lanyard spliced up, or anything else for that matter??? Give me a call- 323-384-7770 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
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16 years 9 months ago #130664 by rangerdude
Thanks. He's trying to get to stand straight up, but lean back in my saddle. I'll try the knee bending tommorrow, if I can climb(weather rainy last few days) Thanks

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16 years 9 months ago - 16 years 9 months ago #130665 by moss
Check out how low the climber in Nick's photo is keeping his center of gravity. His feet are not on the top center of the branch, they are slightly off to one side.

Here's a photo of my foot position during a branch walk, I'm pretty far out on a long upward sloping limb, totally on the side of the limb. There's no right way to limb walk, every branch is different, I just want you to get the feel for using the opposing force of your TIP and bracing yourself with your legs on one side of the branch to feel more secure. Once you get a sense of it you can stand closer to the top of the branch depending on your rope angle and the unique characteristics of the branch. Keep your center of gravity low, it gives you much more body control.
Last edit: 16 years 9 months ago by moss.
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16 years 3 months ago - 16 years 3 months ago #131531 by Holden
This is an extremely helpful drawing, THANKS! (Did moss draw this? if so, you have a future in illustration)

*OOPS* Looked at moss' profile: occupation - graphic artist.

well...makes sense now.

Still, very nice work (as I get into the boards, I'm seeing other examples of your drawings)
Last edit: 16 years 3 months ago by Holden.

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16 years 3 months ago #131533 by moss
Holden wrote:

This is an extremely helpful drawing, THANKS! (Did moss draw this? if so, you have a future in illustration)

*OOPS* Looked at moss' profile: occupation - graphic artist.

well...makes sense now.

Still, very nice work (as I get into the boards, I'm seeing other examples of your drawings)


Thank you Holden.
-moss

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