Wet Nylon Throwline Has More Friction Across a Limb

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18 years 10 months ago - 18 years 10 months ago #125825 by jimk123
A wet nylon throwline has more friction against a limb versus a dry one. The opposing thought was that a layer of water would form between the line and limb and act as a lubricant.

A weight was attached to a nylon line and placed over a 16' limb. The weight was hoisted up to the limb and released. The fall was timed and repeated 4 times. The line was then soaked in water. The same dropping process was repeated 4 times. The wet line times were higher than the dry line times in this fall.

This result is consistent with the knowledge that nylon bonds with the water molecule and softens. This softening generates more friction.

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JimK

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18 years 10 months ago - 18 years 10 months ago #125836 by Tom Dunlap
Giving the throwline a spray of WD40 or something like it would return the slippage. The last ten feet of the line would need to be kept clean though.

Another test would measure the load needed to lift the throwbag with a wet or dry line. To keep things the same you would need to use a smooth barked branch or maybe a piece of large diameter pipe or something.

Strong limbs and single ropes!
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18 years 10 months ago - 18 years 10 months ago #125838 by jimk123
Replied by jimk123 on topic Lubricating the Throw Line
Tom,

I like your suggestion. I've been wondering about PAM too. The target is to make the nylon line more slick. Water as a simple solution didn't work. To lubricate the first few feet that contact the crotch would speed the descent of the falling weight.

An oil compatible with maintaining nylon strength would be a winner.

The guiding principle is that tree entry is the front door to recreational climbing. It needs to be a welcoming activity, not a barrier. There are pitfalls that can eliminated and or reduced. This benefits the newcomer to recreational tree climbing.

Regards,
JimK

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