Light rope

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6 years 7 months ago #136475 by Bushwhacker
Light rope was created by Bushwhacker
So I'm looking for super lightweight rope, and the climbing gear expert at Europe bound suggested I use the 9mm bluewater accessory cord . Do you think this is safe? It says it's rated to 3600 lb/foot.

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6 years 7 months ago - 6 years 7 months ago #136478 by Tree-D
Replied by Tree-D on topic Light rope
Accessory cord is not climbing rope. The minimum rating for life support equipment is it has to support 5400lb, and accessory cord also can't handle heat. I vote "no" for safety.

Be careful, the world is full of "experts" who are more than willing to tell you what you want to hear, if you're determined to find them. The most insidious of the dangerous experts is when you convince yourself!
Last edit: 6 years 7 months ago by Tree-D.
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6 years 7 months ago #136480 by Bushwhacker
Replied by Bushwhacker on topic Light rope
I figured as much. Any recommendations for other rope?

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6 years 7 months ago #136482 by dogwood
Replied by dogwood on topic Light rope
Yes, If you're interested in an advanced, lightweight line, check out Teufelberger Platinum. There are two versions right now, 10.5 mm and 11.5 mm. Looks like a real technical breakthrough. Pricey though! Like Tree-D said, don't even think about using accessory cord for climbing. Also, get with someone who knows what the heck they're doing before you go out there and get yourself in some serious trouble.
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6 years 7 months ago #136488 by moss
Replied by moss on topic Light rope
There are a few tree climbers using PMI 9mm EZ Bend

The problem here (as others are alluding to) is that it's not a smart move to tighten your tree climbing kit to the razor's edge of minimal and light without actually understanding the basics of well accepted rope and harness tree climbing techniques and safety protocols. The goal should not be "Climb as light as possible", the goal should be learn the accepted methods and then make your decisions to modify your technique and gear set based on a solid foundation of experience and skill. It is very difficult to reinvent the wheel if you don't know what a wheel is.
-AJ
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6 years 7 months ago - 6 years 7 months ago #136489 by moss
Replied by moss on topic Light rope
I have climbed on 9mm static ropes (EZ Bend and others) and it's fine if you don't mind ascending on what feels like a shoelace once you get a bit off the ground. On one ascent another climber followed me on the same 9mm rope. I'd tailed up my own long lanyard to climb above the the initial access anchor at around 80' or so. Once I was off the 9mm the second climber started ascending, he got about 25' off the ground and said, "Ahh, no thanks, I'm going back down". It was his rope! 9mm is pretty horrible on long ascents, no matter how static the construction the stretch is ridiculous compared to even a 10mm static. 10mm Sterling HTP is an excellent small diameter static for tree climbing. There would have to be a very very good reason for me to use a 9mm line and I can't think of what it would be ;-)
-AJ
Last edit: 6 years 7 months ago by moss.
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6 years 7 months ago #136490 by Bushwhacker
Replied by Bushwhacker on topic Light rope
The reason why I want to minimise weight is I canopy hammock camp on hiking trips. I have a few more questions:

- A safe rope needs a core and sheath right? That's the primary reason why I didn't buy the bluewater cord at the time. I was taught from rock climbing that having an intact sheath is critical, and the cord didn't even have one. I don't think anyone at Europe bound knows anything about anything anymore.
- what about the beal line of static ropes? They have a couple in the 9-10mm range, and seem to be lighter than other brands.
- Does the sterling htp have a core & sheath? How can you tell?
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6 years 7 months ago #136493 by dogwood
Replied by dogwood on topic Light rope
Hey Bushwhacker,
It seems to me that you really need to start at the beginning. The questions you are asking indicate that you have an idea about hammock camping, and a desire to climb trees. If you want rope for climbing trees, you need to get an arborist's climbing rope from an arborist supply house. Static line is great for a very specific purpose, long vertical ascents, but it's the last thing you need right now.

Tree climbing is wonderful recreation, but if you're going to get involved in climbing trees, understand that you need to get some training from a qualified teacher if you value your life. After a while you might find that some of your rock climbing experience will cross over into tree climbing, but they are two very different disciplines.

Please consider taking the Basic Tree Climbing Course. It's a lot of fun, and it can open you up to a whole new world of adventure! Also, go ahead and order Tree Climbing Basics, right here on this website. Watch it a few times. Seek out an experienced tree climber and climb with him. Have a ton of fun, and tell us about your exploits, but please don't let us find out about you in the newspaper, after the fact.
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6 years 7 months ago #136500 by moss
Replied by moss on topic Light rope

Bushwhacker wrote: The reason why I want to minimise weight is I canopy hammock camp on hiking trips. I have a few more questions:

- A safe rope needs a core and sheath right? That's the primary reason why I didn't buy the bluewater cord at the time. I was taught from rock climbing that having an intact sheath is critical, and the cord didn't even have one. I don't think anyone at Europe bound knows anything about anything anymore.
- what about the beal line of static ropes? They have a couple in the 9-10mm range, and seem to be lighter than other brands.
- Does the sterling htp have a core & sheath? How can you tell?


Makes sense why you want go light. I've hiked multi-day trips with up to 260' of rope, hammock, sleeping bag, the whole 9 yards, sometimes in winter conditions. I'm not any kind super large physical specimen ;-) Consider though you could carry a 60' 11mm arb rope like Bandit and get into any tree with a little less than 60' first limb. Bandit is light and great to climb on. There's no free lunch with the stretch vs. lightness equation. A very lightweight per foot 9mm or 10mm line is going to be very stretchy even if it's classified as a static kernmantle rope. Sterling HTP 10mm is kermantle construction, the core fibers are very dense polyester which creates it's exceptionally low stretch characteristic. It is a joy to climb for long SRT ascents. The trade-off is that it's heavier than stretchy 10mm lines. To learn about a rope's construction and characteristics you can go to the manufacturer's web site, they all have detailed specs for their ropes.
-AJ
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6 years 6 months ago #136513 by Treedude22
Replied by Treedude22 on topic Light rope
All of the above!

Plus if you need to cut weight, cut it where it will not compromise safety.

Another thought, tree climbing is physical, hiking in is physical, hence the combination is a physical activity. Enjoy it, revel in it, make yourself fit the mold. You will be happier and healthier!

Tony

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6 years 6 months ago #136515 by oldtimer
Replied by oldtimer on topic Light rope
I did not see anything about how HIGH the typical trees that you want to climb will be. So depending if you are going to climb say 60 ft to 90 ft a short 120 ft rope of BLAZE rope would be relatively light and safe and cheap. If the majority of the trees are short consider using a shorter rope and that will reduce your rope rather than hauling 200 ft of ultra light technical rope that is never used. Other pieces of your gear including a light comfortable saddle would be part of the equation to consider first. Good Climbs to you! Post pictures of your adventures.

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