Atlas Gloves

 
3.7 (6)

User reviews

6 reviews

 
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(3)
2 stars
 
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Overall rating 
 
3.7
 
2.5  (6)
 
2.8  (6)
 
3.0  (6)
 
4.0  (6)
 
4.0  (6)
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Ordering 
 
Overall rating 
 
3.3
Type of Use 
 
5.0
Frequency of Use 
 
3.0
Durability 
 
2.0
Comfort 
 
5.0
Safety 
 
3.0

You Don't Know What You're Missing

Yes to the statements so far. Read the other reviews then try these. I would be surprised if your own experience is not spot on. Yeah, they get caught and torn up pretty easily until you get used to them. No, they don't last nearly as long as leather gloves. But you can also feel a lot more and do a lot more with them on.



Like I already said when I referred to these gloves in a different review, the grip they afford on my lifeline is so dramatically increased that I went from climbing in "cycles" to a straight walk up the tree. Look, I'm sure many of us have read Jepson's "The Tree Climbers Companion", right? So yeah, for years I thought there was basically one general method to the DdRT -

Step up or swing your legs up,

Thrust your hips forward while taking in your line

Hold the line and advance your hitch

Catch a split-second of rest while beginning a new cycle.



And I make this even easier on myself. A lifetime of guitar, piano and motorcycling has played havoc with my carpal tunnels - so each time, I alternate hands and take 1 wrap of lifeline around the lower wrist to make towing the line that much easier and more comfortable.



Let me tell you, I put these gloves on and it was like Popeye and his spinach. I forgot I was 44 years old. I forgot about carpal tunnel; I only knew carpe diem. I was going up hand over hand for a good 5 or more strides, and then it was like, "What the hell am I supposed to do with this big loop of slack that's all over me????" So you know, until I played around and figured out which hitches work for this new (to me) style, I had to hold myself with one hand and take up the slack with another. And that gets harder and harder after exhausting yourself going up hand over hand. After about 5 or 6 "extended cycles" of this, I was hanging limp, breathing heavy, resting my weary arms and hands, but still laughing while looking down from like, 30 ft. that I had covered in maybe 45 seconds. Shite ! Man, what I would have given for one ground guy on belay during that job!



But the fact that I could do it at all - it's because of the rubber coating. And I don't do this anymore - it wreaks havoc on my carpals. But whether or not you change your speed or technique, these gloves are worth a try. And if you are really strong (and young, ha!) you will blow yourself away with this advantage.

Overall rating 
 
4.7
Type of Use 
 
3.0
Frequency of Use 
 
2.0
Durability 
 
4.0
Comfort 
 
5.0
Safety 
 
5.0

little $, BIG value

I generaly prefer to climb gloveless. I just like the feel of the rope and tree on my bare hands. But when its cold or wet out you can't beat these things. I climb year round and actually use them quite a bit. I don't have too much of an issue tying knots with these on. Occasionaly I'll get it caught up in my blakes while advancing. But not enough to bag them altogether.
I really like these when I'm doing a tree job on a hot, humid day and my hands are all sweaty, slippery and keeping a hold of my 192 is a priority. I beat these to death on the job and am surprised at how well they last. $4 well spent.

Overall rating 
 
4.3
Type of Use 
 
3.0
Frequency of Use 
 
2.0
Durability 
 
4.0
Comfort 
 
4.0
Safety 
 
5.0

Hand Shoes (slippers)

When I saw these "gardening gloves" being used for the first time I was skeptical. Then I tried them. WOW. Really comfortable, like slipper socks for your digits!

These Gloves have nice grip, good dexterity, and hey, you just can't beat the $4-5 price tag.

Caution should be used when sizing them. The fingers can run a bit short sometimes, depending on the users hands. Get a snug fit though. It'll help prevent getting loose material caught in a Blake's.

One of the coolest things about these is that when they get all funkdified from sweat, you can just toss em' in the Maytag and they're like new!

There is also an insulated version available for those of you, like me, who just can't put your gear away when the mercury drops.

Overall rating 
 
2.7
Type of Use 
 
2.0
Frequency of Use 
 
3.0
Durability 
 
1.0
Comfort 
 
5.0
Safety 
 
2.0

New Thin rubber coated gloves

Similar to the original Atlas gloves there are new gloves out that are much thinner. There are pros and cons to these.

Pros:
Much thinner so they aren't as warm
Still have great grip and are much more comfortable
Easier to manipulate knots with gloves still on since they aren't as bulky

Cons:
Tend to wear much faster
***Safety Hazard for novice climber*** The thinner glove can get sucked into the Blake's Hitch during descent. I have had to literally rip the glove out of the knot to free it. For a novice climber this could be scary so I recommend not using the thinner gloves.

Overall rating 
 
3.0
Type of Use 
 
1.0
Frequency of Use 
 
4.0
Durability 
 
3.0
Comfort 
 
1.0
Safety 
 
5.0

Best thing since sliced bread

I don't climb without them. Tremendous energy safer, much less effort required to grip the rope. Takes a few climbs to get used to them. At first you'll get the glove pinched in the hitch then you'll automatically figure out how not to without thinking about it. Provides a secure grip on the rope under any conditions, hot, cold, wet or dry. In wet weather you can wear surgical gloves under the glove to keep your hands dry, works great.



I use the "therma glove" version in the winter.

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