• Uncategorised
    Article Count:
    6
  • Learning the Ropes

    Sycamore on a Sunny DayHanging out in a sycamore tree on a beautiful day.
    Photo by Danny Lyons
    There are many reasons why people climb trees. For some, it's a way to relax and "get away from it all". For others, tree climbing is a career choice, such as tree work or canopy research. No matter what your purpose, TCI and our colleagues can provide tree climbing instruction to anyone who wants to learn, either in courses held in Atlanta or through other tree climbing schools where the instructor's expertise is more appropriate to a student's needs.

    In these pages you will find a complete description of TCI's recreational and entry-level tree worker training programs. Please read them carefully, and then call us for further information.

    Article Count:
    1
    • Introductory Climbs

      When Group climb in KokopelliAn afternoon in "Kokopelli" with Tree Climbing Planet in Portland, Oregon. (Photo by Scott Schieber)you were younger, you climbed a tree, yes? Most people did. You probably used your arms and legs--and your knees and armpits once in a while--to scramble up the branches. Recreational tree climbing with a rope and saddle is a little bit more complicated than that, but just as much fun, and certainly less risky!

      These days, when most children and adults are spending far more time inside than out, recreational tree climbing is an activity that immediately brings every climber "back to nature." Once you're hooked onto a rope with a saddle around your waist and a helmet on your head, the world slows down. You begin to relax as you go aloft, and lo and behold, you're feeling like a new person! Suddenly you might be seeing your climbing tree with different eyes, and you'll never look at a tree the same way again. You might be smelling the fragrance of a recent summer rain, or hearing the wake-up calls of birds looking for mates or protecting their young.

      No matter how "old" you are, you'll find that tree climbing is a safe and unusual way to spend an afternoon! Try it out! Beginners' climbs are always laughter-filled, and our private tree-climbing group outings are reputed to be the best way to celebrate a special occasion. If you come to our school with the people you work with, you may learn something about each of them that you didn't know before!

      Whatever the reason or the season, we look forward to seeing you under the canopy of a beautiful climbing tree!

      Article Count:
      2
    • Recreational Tree Climbing

      Recreational ClimbingAdrian and his son Miles climb in their backyard.
      See lots more tree climbing pictures in our Galleries.
      Tree climbing is an adventure. It starts with placing a rope high in a tree and tying a series of knots. Then you're ready to climb. But your journey is just beginning! When you get to your first branch, it's time to place your rope over a higher branch. You can go to the top or as high as you like! Climbing requires skill, patience, energy, and a certain amount of courage. But the fun and rewards of your accomplishments will be well worth your efforts.

      If you climbed as a child without ropes and want to try a new way to get into a tree, you may want to take one or more of our courses. TCI has several classes and programs designed for any level of climber.

      For someone who is brand new to recreational tree climbing, an "Introductory Climb" gives you a sense of how much fun it can be. You won't have to set up any ropes or tie any knots. All that will be done by the time you arrive.

      For the inexperienced person who wants to be able to climb safely on his or her own, TCI's two-day "Basic Tree Climbing Course" (BTCC) is for you. This course is available on-site in Atlanta or you can do it at home via our online course, which includes our manual and DVD.

      If you have taken a basic tree climbing course and want to learn advanced climbing skills, there's our two-day "Beyond the Basics" class.

      For people who want to become a recreational tree climbing facilitator and/or instructor, we have programs to teach you the skills you'll need.

      Each of our courses is described in detail. Click on a link to learn more!

      Article Count:
      6
    • Helping Others "Learn How"

      Dunwoody climbHere's James, aka "TreeFrog," helping a youngster climb
      at the Dunwoody Nature Center in Atlanta.
      TCI's curriculum for people who want to put beginners on rope or teach others to climb is extensive.

      Some people want to host group events, such as birthday parties or school outings. The tree climbing "facilitator" runs beginners' events. This person sets up the tree with several ropes, shows participants how to use the climbing system, and ensures the safety of all climbers. These two- or three-hour events are a fun way to introduce people to tree climbing.

      Read more: The TCI Facilitator Program

      Other people are more interested in teaching new people to climb on their own. The "instructor" teaches a basic tree climbing class in which people learn to identify safe climbing trees, set up ropes, ascend, descend, use gear, etc., and then gets to see people transform as they become safe and confident tree climbers. Being a tree climbing instructor is very rewarding.

      Read more: The TCI Instructor Program

      Finally, some people want to know how to rescue other climbers from the treetops if necessary. This skill makes them feel safer and more confident if they are leading others on a climbing adventure. In our Treetop Rescue Program, students learn how to get climbers out of a tree quickly and safely, no matter what the situation or condition of the "victim."

      Read more: The TCI Treetop Rescue Program

      We are happy to discuss any of these programs with potential students. Give us a call!

      Article Count:
      3
    • TCI Climbing Program for Entry-Level Tree Workers

      Jepson testimonial


      LEARN SPIKELESS CLIMBING TECHNIQUES. No tree climbing experience necessary!

      Length of program - 5 full days, 9 to 5 (or later) each day

      Maximum class size — 3 students

      Money back guarantee  — TCI guarantees you will learn how to climb safely or we'll refund your tuition.

      Practical Training for Working Climbers
      Tree work is difficult and extremely dangerous. There is no middle ground when you work in the trees. What you do is either right or it's wrong – with potentially disastrous results. That's why worker safety is our first concern and primary emphasis. Throughout our program, students learn the right way to do things as well as the right things to do so they are safe and their work is competent and efficient.

      Most of our students have never climbed a tree with a rope and saddle. No worries. First you'll learn everything you need to climb safely; then we'll teach you more advanced techniques and skills which are used daily on the job. While some theory is taught, our emphasis is on practical, hands–on training. Most of your class time is spent in or under a tree. And, due to our small class size of only three students, you'll get plenty of individual help.

      The TCI Program for Entry-Level Tree Workers: pdfTWP-Outline.pdf

      TreemanPeter "Treeman" JenkinsYour Instructor:  Peter "Treeman" Jenkins, the founder of TCI, is an ISA-certified arborist with over 20 years of accident-free production climbing experience. He has also been teaching tree workers and recreational tree climbers at all skill levels for over 30 years, with no accidents to date. Students come from all over the world to learn from him.

      Prerequisites: Must be in good health, with weight appropriate to height. Must speak some English. Treeman was raised in Texas and can speak a little Spanish, but he is not fluent.

      Gear: If you don't own gear, we suggest that you NOT purchase it until after you have taken our training, when you'll have a much better idea of what's needed. We have all the gear you need to train with, but if you own a saddle, please bring it with you. All of the gear taught during the course is available in the pdfTCI GEAR KIT FOR ENTRY LEVEL TREE WORKERS, which is sold by various vendors around the U.S.

      Cost: $1,200 per person, does not include food and lodging. Advance registration and $200 deposit are required to hold your place. Students who fly to Atlanta and stay at the TCI Clubhouse do not need to rent a car for transportation; talk to us about details.

      Scheduling: TCI's scheduled classes are shown on our calendar. Most of our classes fill up soon after we put them on our public calendar. If you see an open class that you can attend, we urge you to sign up for it quickly. We can also schedule classes upon request. Contact us (if emailing, make sure to include your phone number) to see what's possible. A minimum of two students is required for a class to be confirmed. We keep an active waiting list. 

      Cancellation Policy
      Please read our Cancellation Policy completely.

      The success of each TCI class depends upon every student's participation. We schedule a maximum of only three students per course, and we do not overbook. If you don’t show up, your absence has a major impact on us. Therefore, TCI has the following cancellation policy:

      • If your plans change and you need to cancel, you must call us at least three weeks ahead of time. This gives someone on our waiting list enough time to make travel and personal arrangements to take the course. We will refund your deposit minus a standard $50 cancellation charge if we are able to fill your slot.
      • If you cancel less than three weeks ahead of time, you will forfeit your entire deposit.
      • In the event of a health or family emergency (for which we may require documentation), we may refund your tuition deposit minus our standard $50 cancellation fee.
      • TCI reserves the right to deny future program participation to students who cancel without adequate notice.

      Lodging is comfortable and convenient at the TCI Clubhouse, where some parts of the program are taught. Many restaurants and grocery stores are within easy walking distance.

      Recommended reading: TCI teaches Jeff Jepson's P.R.E.P. system of preparing for tree work, and we highly recommend his book, The Tree Climber's Companion, which we consider the "Bible" for tree workers. We also recommend Jepson's two other excellent books, To Fell A Tree and Knots at Work. All three books are available onsite and in our website store (for a package price if you want all three), and by other vendors.

      ISA CEUs: 32.5 for Certified Arborists, Certified Tree Worker-Climber Specialists, Certified Tree Worker-Aerial Lift Specialists, and Board Certified Master Arborists-Practice available for this program. The code for earned credits will be given to qualifying students after the course.

      Contact us with inquiries or to register. PLEASE INCLUDE YOUR PHONE NUMBER!

       

      Article Count:
      1
  • Videos
    Article Count:
    0
  • Gear Rater

    Welcome to the TCI Gear Rater! 

    GearThis is Treeman's "Petzl paw," rigged out
    with all sorts of climbing equipment. Do
    you own any of these items? Rate them
    — and others — here!
    TCI's Gear Rater lets you see how other climbers rate the gear they're using. Are you unfamiliar with a particular type or style of gear? Not sure if it's right for you? Check back often for new evaluations and/or new gear. You may be surprised what you'll learn here!

    Rating Guidelines

    Readers and reviewers will find rating guidelines for each type of gear on each category page. Star ratings are the average of all factors except type of use and frequency of use. These two factors tell you more about who the reviewer is and under what conditions the gear is being used. Take these into account as you evaluate whether the review is useful to you for a particular type of equipment.

    Post Reviews or Add to Items for Review

    Please remember: All visitors to our site can read gear ratings, but only people who are registered can post reviews and/or use our "Gear Rater Form" to submit new items for review. If you're not registered but you are a climber with gear you particularly like or dislike, please register and and tell our community about it. The Gear Rater will become an invaluable tool for all climbers--recreational and professional--as more and more of you express your opinions about various tree climbing equipment.

    Basic information about tree climbing gear can be found in our "All About Gear" section.

     

    Article Count:
    0
    • Ropes

      Please use the following guidelines in your evaluation of ropes:

      Type of use: 1=Professional, 5=Recreational 3=Both
      Frequency of use: 1=once every 2-3 months, 2=once a month, 3=2-3 times/month, 4=1-2 times/week,
      5=3-5 times/week
      Durability: 1=falls apart with infrequent use, 5=holds up extremely well with frequent use
      Ease of use/set-up: 1=difficult, 5=easy
      Safety: 1=easy to make mistake/gear failure, 5=reliable under any conditions

      Overall user ratings of ropes are based on an average of durability, ease of use, and safety. Type of use and frequency of use averages are shown for information only.


      More information about tree climbing ropes is in our "All About Gear" section.

      Article Count:
      12
    • Saddles

      Please use the following guidelines in your evaluation of saddles:

      Type of use: 1=Professional, 5=Recreational, 3=Both
      Frequency of use: 1=once every 2-3 months, 2=once a month, 3=2-3 times/month, 4=1-2 times/week
      5=3-5 times/week
      Durability: 1=falls apart with infrequent use, 5=holds up extremely well with frequent use
      Comfort: 1=very uncomfortable, 5=very comfortable
      Ease of use/set-up: 1=difficult, 5=easy
      Portability: 1=very difficult to carry, 5=very easy to carry

      Overall user ratings for saddles are based on an average of durability, comfort, ease of use, and portability. Type of use and frequency of use averages are listed for information purposes only.


      More information about saddles can be found in our "All About Gear" section.

      Article Count:
      13
    • Helmets

      Please use the following guidelines in your evaluation of helmets:

      Type of use: 1=Professional, 5=Recreational, 3=Both
      Frequency of use: 1=once every 2-3 months, 2=once a month, 3=2-3 times/month, 4=1-2 times/week
      5=3-5 times/week
      Durability: 1=falls apart with infrequent use, 5=holds up extremely well with frequent use
      Comfort: 1=very uncomfortable, 5=very comfortable
      Safety: 1=easy to make mistake / gear failure, 5=reliable under any conditions

      Overall user ratings for helmets are based on an average of durability, comfort, and safety. Type of use and frequency of use averages are for information purposes only.


      More information about helmets can be found in our "All About Gear" section.

      Article Count:
      4
    • Carabiners, Screw Links, and Snaps

      For ease of use, we have divided this category into Carabiners, Screw Links, and Snaps pages. Please use the menu at right to view these items.

      Article Count:
      0
      • Carabiners

        Please use the following guidelines in your evaluation of carabiners:

        Type of use: 1=Professional, 5=Recreational, 3=Both
        Frequency of use: 1=once every 2-3 months, 2=once a month, 3=2-3 times/month, 4=1-2 times/week
        5=3-5 times/week
        Durability: 1=falls apart with infrequent use, 5=holds up extremely well with frequent use
        Ease of use/set-up: 1=difficult, 5=easy
        Safety: 1=easy to make mistake / gear failure, 5=reliable under any conditions
        Strength: 1=breaks easily, 5=rarely or never breaks

        Overall user ratings for carabiners are based on an average of durability, ease of use, safety, and strength. Type of use and frequency of use statistics are for information purposes only.


        More information about carabiners, screw links, and snaps can be found in our "All About Gear" section.

        Article Count:
        11
      • Screw Links

        Please use the following guidelines in your evaluation of screw links:

        Type of use: 1=Professional, 5=Recreational, 3=Both
        Frequency of use: 1=once every 2-3 months, 2=once a month, 3=2-3 times/month, 4=1-2 times/week
        5=3-5 times/week
        Durability: 1=falls apart with infrequent use, 5=holds up extremely well with frequent use
        Ease of use/set-up: 1=difficult, 5=easy
        Safety: 1=easy to make mistake / gear failure, 5=reliable under any conditions
        Strength: 1=breaks easily, 5=rarely or never breaks

        Overall user ratings for screw links are based on an average of durability, ease of use, safety, and strength. Type of use and frequency of use statistics are for information purposes only.


        More information about screw links can be found in our "All About Gear" section.

        Article Count:
        2
      • Snaps

        Please use the following guidelines in your evaluation of snaps:

        Type of use: 1=Professional, 5=Recreational, 3=Both
        Frequency of use: 1=once every 2-3 months, 2=once a month, 3=2-3 times/month, 4=1-2 times/week
        5=3-5 times/week
        Durability: 1=falls apart with infrequent use, 5=holds up extremely well with frequent use
        Ease of use/set-up: 1=difficult, 5=easy
        Safety: 1=easy to make mistake / gear failure, 5=reliable under any conditions
        Strength: 1=breaks easily, 5=rarely or never breaks

        Overall user ratings for snaps are based on an average of durability, ease of use, safety, and strength. Type of use and frequency of use statistics are for information purposes only.


        More information about snaps can be found in our "All About Gear" section.

        Article Count:
        2
    • Pulleys

      Please use the following guidelines in your evaluation of pulleys:

      Type of use: 1=Professional, 5=Recreational, 3=Both
      Frequency of use: 1=once every 2-3 months, 2=once a month, 3=2-3 times/month, 4=1-2 times/week
      5=3-5 times/week
      Durability:

      1=falls apart with infrequent use, 5=holds up extremely well with frequent use

      Technical skill required
      (experienced users):

      1=difficult to figure out, 5=easy to figure out

      Ease of use/set-up: 1=difficult, 5=easy
      Safety: 1=easy to make mistake/gear failure, 5=reliable under any conditions

      Overall user ratings of pulleys are based on an average of durability, technical skill required, ease of use/set-up, and safety. Type of use and frequency of use averages are shown for information only.


      More information about pulleys can be found in our "All About Gear" section.

      Article Count:
      7
    • Line Placement Gear

      For ease of use, we have divided line placement gear into four categories: throw weights, throw lines, devices, and cubes. Please use the menu at right to view each category.

      Article Count:
      0
      • Line Placement Gear--Throw Weights

        Please use the following guidelines in your evaluation of throw weights:

        Type of use: 1=Professional, 5=Recreational, 3=Both
        Frequency of use: 1=once every 2-3 months, 2=once a month, 3=2-3 times/month, 4=1-2 times/week
        5=3-5 times/week
        Durability:

        1=falls apart with infrequent use, 5=holds up extremely well with frequent use

        Technical skill required
        (experienced users):

        1=difficult to figure out, 5=easy to figure out

        Ease of use/set-up: 1=difficult, 5=easy
        Safety: 1=easy to make mistake/gear failure, 5=reliable under any conditions

        Overall user ratings of line placement gear are based on an average of durability, technical skill required, ease of use/set-up, and safety. Type of use and frequency of use averages are shown for information only.


        More information about throw weights can be found in our "All About Gear" section.

        Article Count:
        6
      • Line Placement Gear--Throw Lines

        Please use the following guidelines in your evaluation of throw lines:

        Type of use: 1=Professional, 5=Recreational, 3=Both
        Frequency of use: 1=once every 2-3 months, 2=once a month, 3=2-3 times/month, 4=1-2 times/week
        5=3-5 times/week
        Durability:

        1=falls apart with infrequent use, 5=holds up extremely well with frequent use

        Technical skill required
        (experienced users):

        1=difficult to figure out, 5=easy to figure out

        Ease of use/set-up: 1=difficult, 5=easy
        Safety: 1=easy to make mistake/gear failure, 5=reliable under any conditions

        Overall user ratings of line placement gear are based on an average of durability, technical skill required, ease of use/set-up, and safety. Type of use and frequency of use averages are shown for information only.


        More information about throw weightsr can be found in our "All About Gear" section.

        Article Count:
        7
      • Line Placement Gear--Devices

        Please use the following guidelines in your evaluation of line placement devices:

        Type of use: 1=Professional, 5=Recreational, 3=Both
        Frequency of use: 1=once every 2-3 months, 2=once a month, 3=2-3 times/month, 4=1-2 times/week
        5=3-5 times/week
        Durability:

        1=falls apart with infrequent use, 5=holds up extremely well with frequent use

        Technical skill required
        (experienced users):

        1=difficult to figure out, 5=easy to figure out

        Ease of use/set-up: 1=difficult, 5=easy
        Safety: 1=easy to make mistake/gear failure, 5=reliable under any conditions

        Overall user ratings of line placement gear are based on an average of durability, technical skill required, ease of use/set-up, and safety. Type of use and frequency of use averages are shown for information only.


        More information about line placement devices can be found in our "All About Gear" section.

        Article Count:
        6
      • Line Placement Gear--Cubes

        Please use the following guidelines in your evaluation of throwline cubes:

        Frequency of use: 1=once every 2-3 months, 2=once a month, 3=2-3 times/month, 4=1-2 times/week
        5=3-5 times/week
        Durability: 1=falls apart with infrequent use, 5=holds up extremely well with frequent use
        Ease of use/set-up: 1=difficult, 5=easy
        Strength: 1=breaks easily, 5=rarely or never breaks
        Portability: 1=very difficult to carry, 5=very easy to carry

        Overall user ratings are based on the average of durability, ease of use, strength, and portability. The frequency of use average is for information purposes only.


        Information about throwline cubes and other line placement equipment can be found in our "All About Gear" section.

        Article Count:
        3
    • Branch/Rope Protection

      Please use the following guidelines in your evaluation of cambium/rope protection gear:

      Type of use: 1=Professional, 5=Recreational, 3=Both
      Frequency of use: 1=once every 2-3 months, 2=once a month, 3=2-3 times/month, 4=1-2 times/week
      5=3-5 times/week
      Durability: 1=falls apart with infrequent use, 5=holds up extremely well with frequent use
      Technical skill required: 1=difficult to figure out, 5=easy to figure out
      Ease of use/set-up: 1=difficult, 5=easy
      Portability: 1=very difficult to carry, 5=very easy to carry

      Overall user ratings for cambium/rope protection gear are based on an average of durability, technical skill required, ease of use, and portability. Type of use and frequency of use averages are for information purposes only.


      Information about branch savers can be found in our "All About Gear" section.

      Article Count:
      5
    • Ascending and Descending Devices

      WE ARE UPDATING THIS SECTION. Please come back in a few days.

      Article Count:
      0
      • Ascending Tools

        Please use the following guidelines in your evaluation of ascending tools:

        Type of use: 1=Professional, 5=Recreational, 3=Both
        Frequency of use: 1=once every 2-3 months, 2=once a month, 3=2-3 times/month, 4=1-2 times/week
        5=3-5 times/week
        Durability: 1=falls apart with infrequent use, 5=holds up extremely well with frequent use
        Technical skill required: 1=difficult to figure out, 5=easy to figure out
        Ease of use/set-up: 1=difficult, 5=easy
        Safety: 1=easy to make mistake / gear failure, 5=reliable under any conditions
        Strength: 1=breaks easily, 5=rarely or never breaks
        Portability: 1=very difficult to carry, 5=very easy to carry

        Overall user ratings for ascending tools are based on an average of durability, technical skill required, ease of use, safety, strength, and portability. Type of use and frequency of use statistics are for information purposes only.


        Information about ascending tools can be found in our "All About Gear" section.

        Article Count:
        19
      • Descending Tools

        Please use the following guidelines in your evaluation of descending tools:

        Type of use: 1=Professional, 5=Recreational, 3=Both
        Frequency of use: 1=once every 2-3 months, 2=once a month, 3=2-3 times/month, 4=1-2 times/week
        5=3-5 times/week
        Durability: 1=falls apart with infrequent use, 5=holds up extremely well with frequent use
        Technical skill required: 1=difficult to figure out, 5=easy to figure out
        Ease of use/set-up: 1=difficult, 5=easy
        Safety: 1=easy to make mistake / gear failure, 5=reliable under any conditions
        Strength: 1=breaks easily, 5=rarely or never breaks
        Portability: 1=very difficult to carry, 5=very easy to carry

        Overall user ratings for descending tools are based on an average of durability, technical skill required, ease of use, safety, strength, and portability. Type of use and frequency of use statistics are for information purposes only.


        Information about descending tools can be found in our "All About Gear" section.

        Article Count:
        7
      • Combination Devices

        Please use the following guidelines in your evaluation of combination ascending/descending devices:

        Type of use: 1=Professional, 5=Recreational, 3=Both
        Frequency of use: 1=once every 2-3 months, 2=once a month, 3=2-3 times/month, 4=1-2 times/week
        5=3-5 times/week
        Durability: 1=falls apart with infrequent use, 5=holds up extremely well with frequent use
        Technical skill required: 1=difficult to figure out, 5=easy to figure out
        Ease of use/set-up: 1=difficult, 5=easy
        Safety: 1=easy to make mistake / gear failure, 5=reliable under any conditions
        Strength: 1=breaks easily, 5=rarely or never breaks
        Portability: 1=very difficult to carry, 5=very easy to carry

        Overall user ratings for ascending and descending tools are based on an average of durability, technical skill required, ease of use, safety, strength, and portability. Type of use and frequency of use statistics are for information purposes only.


        Information about combination ascending/descending devices can be found in our "All About Gear" section.

        Article Count:
        4
    • Lanyard Positioning Devices

      Please use the following guidelines in your evaluation of lanyard positioning devices:

      Type of use: 1=Professional, 5=Recreational, 3=Both
      Frequency of use: 1=once every 2-3 months, 2=once a month, 3=2-3 times/month, 4=1-2 times/week
      5=3-5 times/week
      Durability: 1=falls apart with infrequent use, 5=holds up extremely well with frequent use
      Technical skill required: 1=difficult to figure out, 5=easy to figure out
      Ease of use/set-up: 1=difficult, 5=easy
      Safety: 1=easy to make mistake / gear failure, 5=reliable under any conditions
      Strength: 1=breaks easily, 5=rarely or never breaks
      Portability: 1=very difficult to carry, 5=very easy to carry

      Overall user ratings for lanyard positioning devices are based on an average of durability, technical skill required, ease of use, safety, strength, and portability. Type of use and frequency of use statistics are for information purposes only.


      Information about lanyards can be found in our "All About Gear" section.

      Article Count:
      6
    • Gear Storage

      Please use the following guidelines in your evaluation of storage systems and bags:

      Frequency of use: 1=once every 2-3 months, 2=once a month, 3=2-3 times/month, 4=1-2 times/week
      5=3-5 times/week
      Durability: 1=falls apart with infrequent use, 5=holds up extremely well with frequent use
      Ease of use/set-up: 1=difficult, 5=easy
      Strength: 1=breaks easily, 5=rarely or never breaks
      Portability: 1=very difficult to carry, 5=very easy to carry

      Overall user ratings are based on the average of durability, ease of use, strength, and portability. The frequency of use average is for information purposes only.


      Information about gear storage can be found in our "All About Gear" section.

      Article Count:
      11
    • Safety Gear

      Please use the following guidelines in your evaluation of safety gear:

      Type of use: 1=Professional, 5=Recreational, 3=Both
      Frequency of use: 1=once every 2-3 months, 2=once a month, 3=2-3 times/month, 4=1-2 times/week
      5=3-5 times/week
      Durability: 1=falls apart with infrequent use, 5=holds up extremely well with frequent use
      Comfort: 1=very uncomfortable, 5=very comfortable
      Safety: 1=easy to make mistake / gear failure, 5=reliable under any conditions

      The overall user rating for safety gear is based on the average of durability, comfort, and safety. Type of use and frequency of use averages are for information purposes only.


      Information about safety gear can be found in our "All About Gear" section.

      Article Count:
      5
    • Hammocks and Portaledges

      Please use the following guidelines in your evaluation of hammocks and portaledges:

      Frequency of use: 1=once every 2-3 months, 2=once a month, 3=2-3 times/month, 4=1-2 times/week
      5=3-5 times/week
      Durability: 1=falls apart with infrequent use, 5=holds up extremely well with frequent use
      Comfort: 1=very uncomfortable, 5=very comfortable
      Technical skill required: 1=difficult to figure out, 5=easy to figure out
      Ease of use/set-up: 1=difficult, 5=easy
      Safety: 1=easy to make mistake / gear failure, 5=reliable under any conditions
      Strength: 1=breaks easily, 5=rarely or never breaks
      Portability: 1=very difficult to carry, 5=very easy to carry

      Overall user ratings for hammocks and portaledges are based on an average of all characteristics above except frequency of use, which is listed for information purposes only.


      Information about hammocks and portaledges can be found in our "All About Gear" section.

      Article Count:
      3
  • Tree Climbing

    dan-stan--ssIs it obvious how much our good friends Stan Stalnaker (left) and Dan House (right) love climbing trees?

    "Technical" (rope and harness) tree climbing is a safe activity that people all over the world enjoy. Why do they do it? What kind of gear do they use, and how do they get up into the trees? Do they damage the trees? What safety guidelines do they follow to protect themselves against accidents and injuries?

    All these questions and more are answered in these pages.

    Article Count:
    4
    • Choosing a Tree

      ChoosingThis tree at the Duke Farms Environmental Center
      has all the features of a perfect climbing tree.
      Choosing the right tree to climb involves more than just finding an interesting tree somewhere. You need to have answers to questions such as:

      • Am I allowed to climb this tree?
      • Are the tree's branches big enough to support me?
      • Is the tree safe to climb?

      Read the following articles carefully! They will answer these questions and address many more issues to help you be a legal and safe tree climber.

       

      Article Count:
      2
    • Guidelines for Safe Climbing
      Article Count:
      1
    • Tree Climbing Gear

      Most new climbers share the same confusion when they buy gear for the first time: "There's so much out there! What should I get?" "Will I really use it?" "Will it hold up?" Excellent questions, because if you don’t know what you’re looking for, you can spend a fortune buying gear you don't need and won’t use.

      The kind of gear you purchase will depend on your reasons for being in the trees. We’ve divided tree climbers into three types:

      • The casual recreational climber gets up into the trees once in a while for fun. For you, a tremendous amount of gear is not necessary.
      • The adventure climber goes out to climb fairly regularly. As you move beyond “novice,” you’ll probably want the gear and gizmos for more advanced climbing techniques.
      • The professional climber goes up into trees daily on the job. Climbing gear is all-important and a central focus of concern, especially the special purpose gear to get work done safely and efficiently.

      In this section, we’ll review all the basic types of climbing gear, what they are used for, and what to look for when you buy. However, before we begin, we want to remind you of some fundamental rules about basic tree-climbing equipment which always apply:

      • Don't buy used gear. You don’t know its history. Buy only new and high quality gearl. You’re going to be in some dangerous situations, and your life will depend on the condition of your equipment.
      • Store gear in a safe, protected area. Keep it away from chemicals and dirty places.
      • Inspect gear often for wear and damage. With good care, your gear will last many years and take you to many extraordinary places.
      • Follow appropriate safety guidelines for climbing, and the safety guidelines and protocols for each kind of gear you use. No piece of hardware can replace good safety procedures, and safety procedures can’t make up for improper use of gear.
      Article Count:
      13
    • Names

      Tree climbers come up with names for the trees they climb and a climbing name for themselves. We found that it added something different -- and fun! -- to the sport.

      Article Count:
      2
    • Treeman's Blog
      Treeman's blog is a special place on the Tree Climbers International site where you can read what TCI's founder has to say about all kinds of things. His posts are funny, informative, and interesting!
      Article Count:
      0
  • All About Tree Climbers International

    General information about Tree Climbers International, Inc., the world's first organization for recreational tree climbers:

    P.O. Box 5588 Atlanta, GA 31107 USA
    Phone: (404) 377-3150
    E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

    Article Count:
    0
    • Membership

      TCI needs your support to be able to serve the rapidly expanding international tree-climbing community. Join our organization and help us grow!

      Benefits of Membership:

      • Lifetime membership in an organization just for tree climbers!
      • Read and post on TCI's electronic message board
      • Notification of new issues of TCI's newsletter, "Tree Climbing Online"
      • A one-time 10% discount coupon for gear from Sherrill Arborist Supply
      • A bumper sticker and embroidered badge of the TCI logo

       

      Article Count:
      4
    • What Is TCI?
      History, Mission Statement, Membership Benefits for Tree Climbers International.
      Article Count:
      2
    • All About TCI
      Article Count:
      1
  • Legal
    Article Count:
    0
  • News
    Select a news topic from the list below, then select a news article to read.
    Article Count:
    0

Visitor Login